Outcome Goals Archives - JP & Associates REALTORS®
Small Shifts Magnify Outcomes

Small Shifts Magnify Outcomes

I was recently reflecting on some coaching conversations and thinking about vectors. Let me explain:

In math and physics, a vector is a quantity having direction as well as magnitude, especially as determining the position of one point in space relative to another.

If a pilot makes the slightest one-degree error in the aircraft’s flight path, after traveling one mile the plane will be off the course by 92 feet. And after going 60 miles, that error adds up to being a mile off the path.

A minor off course adjustment over time and distance magnifies the error. If a pilot were flying from New York to L.A. a one-degree shift in the flight path over the entire course would put the plane 40 miles to the South in Orange County at SNA not Los Angeles at LAX.

“The secret of your success is found in your daily routine. You alone are responsible for what you do, don’t do, or how you respond to what’s done to you.” Darren Hardy, The Compound Effect

I work with a lot of entrepreneurs, and many times they call with a complete overall idea – overwhelmed and burned out – yet many times it’s just the 1-degree change that compounds over time. Yes? Who can relate?

The compound effect, it works both ways. What small course correction can you make this week?

 

What we can learn from Louis Pasteur

What we can learn from Louis Pasteur

Friday night reading – you know I love breakthrough stories.

I knew Louis Pasteur was the father of microbiology and known for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, pasteurization, and the causes and prevention of diseases. I knew his discoveries have saved many lives. I didn’t know the sacrifice, the danger and the obstacles he had to overcome:

  • To find the cure for rabies he had to endure working with mad dogs and overcome extreme doubt about the first test injection;
  • He was mocked and ridiculed for suggesting hand washing to prevent infection and the spread of disease. It took 19 years before that practice was widely accepted;
  • One of his colleagues died helping stop the spread of cholera in Egypt, he wrote “he died on the battlefield of science passing through this life with a higher thought to which he sacrificed all else.

I know most of us aren’t solving such complex problems, yet our obstacles have the same impact on whatever we are trying to accomplish.

What I learned from Louis is:

• Despite his doubts and fears, he continued to take action
• Despite the confusion, lack of clarity he kept moving forward
• He stepped backed to gain perspective vs becoming overwhelmed
• He became resourceful, seeking out the necessary help
• He distanced himself from any drama
• He stayed focused on his commitments despite his feelings
• He developed and refined a growth mindset

My biggest takeaway is: it is vital you take consistent action in spite of your fears and doubts.

 

What Would Happen If You Never Tolerated Inaction In Yourself?

What Would Happen If You Never Tolerated Inaction In Yourself?

What would happen if you never tolerated inaction in yourself? Think about that for a moment, what would happen if you never tolerated inaction in yourself?

From the book, Atomic Habits, there is a common mistake that often happens to too many of us. The mistake has to do with the difference between being in motion and taking action. They sound similar, but they’re not the same.

When you’re in motion, you’re planning and strategizing and learning. Those are all good things, but they don’t produce a result. Action, on the other hand, is the type of behavior that will deliver an outcome.

Here’s a couple of practical examples:

  • If I outline 20 ideas for articles I want to write, that’s motion. If I actually write and publish an article, that’s action.
  • If I email 10 new leads for my business and start conversations with them, that’s motion. When I actually set an appointment that’s action.
  • If I search for a better diet plan and read a few books on the topic, that’s motion. If I actually eat a healthy meal, that’s action.

Sometimes motion is useful, yet it will never produce an outcome by itself. It doesn’t matter how many times you go talk to the personal trainer, that motion will never get you in shape. Only the action of working out will get the result you’re looking to achieve.

If motion doesn’t lead to results, why do we do it?

Sometimes we do it because we actually need to plan or learn more. But more often than not, we do it because motion allows us to feel like we’re making progress without running the risk of failure. Most of us are experts at avoiding criticism. It doesn’t feel good to fail or to be judged publicly, so we tend to avoid situations where that might happen. And that’s the biggest reason why you slip into motion rather than taking action: you want to delay failure.

It’s easy to be in motion and convince yourself that you’re still making progress. You think, “I’ve got conversations going with four potential clients right now. This is good. We’re moving in the right direction.” Motion makes you feel like you’re getting things done. But really, you’re just preparing to get something done. When preparation becomes a form of procrastination, you need to change something. You don’t want to merely be planning. You want to be practicing.

TRYceratops VS DOceratops

Some ideas to get out of motion and into action:

  1. Work expands to the time you give it: Set a specific time for each task.
  2. Set a schedule for your actions: Basic time blocking.
  3. Pick a date to shift you from motion to action: set hard deadlines.
  4. Ignore, switch your feelings: “I don’t feel like it” to “Let’s get this done!”

For some goals, setting a daily or weekly schedule doesn’t work as well. This is the case if you’re doing something that is only going to happen once: studying for your broker exam or getting your GRI. These things require some planning upfront (motion). They also require plenty of action to complete them. For example, you could set a schedule each week to study. In a situation like this, research shows it’s best to simply pick a date. Put something on the calendar – like the test date. Make it public. This is when X is happening. In other words, set a HARD DEADLINE.

Research shows that people who make a specific plan for when and where they will perform a new habit are more likely to follow through. Too many people try to change their habits without these basic details figured out. We tell ourselves, “I’m going to eat healthier” or “I’m going to write more,” but we never say when and where these habits are going to happen. We leave it up to chance and hope that we will “just remember to do it” or feel motivated at the right time.

Hope is not a strategy!

An implementation intention sweeps away foggy notions like “I want to work out more” or “I want to be more productive” or “I should vote” and transforms them into a concrete plan of action.

Many people think they lack motivation when what they really lack is clarity.

One simple way to apply this strategy to your habits is to fill out this sentence:

I will [BEHAVIOR] at [TIME] in [LOCATION]

  • I will follow up with 4 leads a day for 30 minutes at 9 a.m. in my office.
  • I will complete part 1 of my project investing twenty minutes at 10 a.m. in my office.
  • I will exercise for one hour at 5 p.m. at my gym.
  • I will make my wife a cup of tea at 7 a.m. each morning in the kitchen.

Give your habits time and space. The goal is to make the time and location so obvious that, with enough repetition, you get an urge to do the right thing at the right time, even if you can’t say why.

To put it simply: planning out when and where you will perform a specific behavior turns your environment into a trigger for action. The time and place trigger your behavior, not your level of motivation.

Motivation is short-lived and doesn’t lead to consistent action. If you want to achieve your goals, then you need a plan for exactly when and how you’re going to execute on them regardless of how you feel.

There are some lessons that the only #failure can teach. Failure is not the problem… inaction is… procrastination is.

Let’s commit this week to move from motion to action.

#WinTheDay

 

So How Consistent Are You Right Now?

So How Consistent Are You Right Now?

When you are inconsistent, nothing works. Here’s what I know: agents who are consistently setting and going on appointments are producing more results, period. These agents are consistent and disciplined in their daily routine of prospecting and marketing.

Consistency… social media does not work if you are not consistent; geographic farming does not work if you are not consistent; repeat and referral do not work if you are not consistent; open houses do not work if you are inconsistent; online leads do not work if you are not consistent.

Show me something in your life or business that works when you are inconsistent. Anything you are going to do, the more consistent you are with your mindset, your attitude, your approach, your expectation, your strategy and your tactics the more predictable the result. Bottom line: when you are consistent everything works… when you are inconsistent nothing works.

So my question is, what have you been inconsistent with? What has that inconsistency cost you financially, cost you emotionally, cost you physically?

I’d submit the action –  we can all be more consistent in setting and going on more appointments.

We CANNOT control the market.

We CAN control ourselves, our thoughts and our actions.

Next Steps:

1. Make an appointment setting goal for the next 2 weeks and share it with an accountability partner.

2. Gather your past client list, all of your past leads, open house registers and people you know and start making appointments today.

3. Be CONSISTENT… list the 1, 2 or 3 things that you must do on a consistent basis that will propel your business forward.

#WinTheDay

 

The Problem With The Traditional To-do List

The Problem With The Traditional To-do List

Outcomes matter.

The problem with the traditional to-do list is that it’s about tasks and not about outcomes.

An outcome could be something like:  “increase revenue by 25%” or “build a relationship with specific people.”

There is no single task that will cause the outcome. There is arguably a set of tasks that could build up to it.

Concrete, measurable outcomes are better than vague ones, but some highly desirable outcomes can only be qualitatively stated (like relationships) and cannot be quantified (like the number of appointments).

So for myself, I am working to get better at linking my daily tasks to the outcome via process goals. More importantly, I am also trying to nail down this art of defining the process that leads to the desired outcome.

For you that might be 3 or more NEW appointments each week. So I’d rather see something like this:

Create 3 or more new appointments each week… then list the task, there process to support that outcome.

Creating 2 or more closings per month between now and the end of the year and then list the associated process that will lead to appointments that will lead to signed agreements.

Deepen my relationship with 4 people… then list people and the process that will achieve that outcome

Make sense?

What are your key outcomes and associated processes for this week?

PS: You might want to check out a recent blog on the difference between outcome goals, process goals and performance goals.