Mark Johnson, Author at JP & Associates REALTORS®
 
Episode 107: Kelly Snodgrass – There Has To Be A Connection

Episode 107: Kelly Snodgrass – There Has To Be A Connection

On episode 107 of Success Superstars, real life Wonder Woman Kelly Snodgrass from Arlington, Texas talks with Mark Johnson, CEO of JP & Associates Realtors about what drives her to keep being a team leader, JPAR Texas Managing Broker, wife, volunteer at church, coach and more. About 85% of Kelly’s past clients come back to do business with her.
“There has to be a connection.” – Kelly Snodgress
Now available on the go: listen to inspirational stories on all podcast platforms including Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Spotify, just search ‘Success Superstars’ anywhere you listen to your favorite podcasts.
Be Your Best When It Matters Most

Be Your Best When It Matters Most

These are unprecedented times.

As I sat down to write this week’s blog, one word came to mind: GRIT. One definition of grit is the passion and perseverance for long-term and meaningful goals. All of you that I work with have significant short term and long-term goals; thus, my intention today is to provide some perspective on grit, how you can apply it, and practical next steps to stay in positive motion.

Some of the best work on grit is by Angela Duckworth if you haven’t seen her TED talk, I highly recommend it. Click here.

Grit is also a term psychologist use to describe abiding perseverance. Not just the energy it takes to push through a difficult task, but the power needed to push through weeks or months of challenging tasks. A characteristic many of us will need in the weeks and months ahead.

One of the best four-word descriptions of grit comes from Scottish philosopher Thomas Carlyle, and he said it three hundred years ago. It was right then, and it’s still valid now: “No pressure; No diamonds.”

No pressure; No diamonds.

Diamonds form because carbon is set under extreme pressure in the earth. Without pressure, it would just be carbon, or maybe it would turn into graphite. This phrase is saying that the “gems of humanity” our greatest feats, works, endeavors, only happen when we are placed under enormous pressure. Another common expression is “there is no gain without pain.” Yet another is “the finest steel is forged in the hottest fires.”

My point being. This is our time. It truly is in our moments of decision that our destiny is made. We can choose to live in fear or faith. We can choose to live in doubt, lack, and limitation or choose joy, satisfaction, gratitude, and appreciation. It’s a choice.

I suppose it was in basic training that I started to learn the basics of grit, the need to control my thoughts on a nearly moment-by-moment basis. The type of grit needed when fear, doubt, and disappointment are regular companions.

It seems the real secret of managing my mindset is to exploit that little gap between the moment a thought arises and the moment our brain attaches emotion to that thought. When you get into that gap, you can replace a thought that does not serve you with a better one, thus neutralizing the stress response in the short term and reprogramming the brain over the long term. By observing and dealing with your thoughts as they arise, you start to notice this gap and can close it.

So, what can we do? Three steps to consider right now:

It’s never been more important to stay in a consistent routine and foster a growth mindset

If you have a growth mindset, you believe everyone can grow and change through the application, exercise, and a lot of hard work. Adhering to a routine – like connecting with ten people a day – allows us to foster habits that match our goals and aspirations. While our routine helps us develop good habits that are in line with exploiting our full potential, it also helps to eradicate habits that do not serve us well.

Be a Voice of Value

Right now, your tribe needs you more than ever, so be there for them. With social distancing, you might not be able to see people physically, but you can still video call, text, email, and write personal notes. Use data from www.jparinsights.com to be the voice of reason, offer a helping hand. Be resourceful and ask yourself how you can serve your customers, your neighbors and your community in this time of difficulty while still practicing social distancing, robust handwashing, and sanitary measures.

Learn more to earn more

Now is the perfect time to commit to some extra sales training. Your skills pay the bills, so take this opportunity to invest in yourself and keep them sharp. Lead generation and relationship-building are two pillars we can never learn enough. At JPAR have over 100 on-line pieces of training and access to some of the best continuing education on the planet at www.jparce.com plus the world-class BANK vault at www.jparvault.com proven to increase your sales by 300%.

Stay safe, my friends, and be the best when it matters most.

#WinTheDay

 

 

Three Reasons Why This Is Not a Housing Crisis

Three Reasons Why This Is Not a Housing Crisis

In times of uncertainty, one of the best things we can do to ease our fears is to educate ourselves with research, facts, and data. Digging into past experiences by reviewing historical trends and understanding the peaks and valleys of what’s come before us is one of the many ways we can confidently evaluate any situation. With concerns of a global recession on everyone’s minds today, it’s important to take an objective look at what has transpired over the years and how the housing market has successfully weathered these storms.

1. The Market Today Is Vastly Different from 2008

We all remember in 2008. This is not 2008. Today’s market conditions are far from the time when housing was a key factor that triggered a recession. From easy-to-access mortgages to skyrocketing home price appreciation, a surplus of inventory, excessive equity-tapping, and more – we’re not where we were 12 years ago. None of those factors are in play today. Rest assured, housing is not a catalyst that could spiral us back to that time or place.

According to Danielle Hale, Chief Economist at Realtor.com, if there is a recession:

“It will be different than the Great Recession. Things unraveled pretty quickly, and then the recovery was pretty slow. I would expect this to be milder. There’s no dysfunction in the banking system, we don’t have many households who are overleveraged with their mortgage payments and are potentially in trouble.”

The Goldman Sachs GDP Forecast released this week indicates that although there is no growth anticipated immediately, gains are forecasted heading into the second half of this year and getting even stronger in early 2021. Both of these expert sources indicate this is a momentary event in time, not a collapse of the financial industry. It is a drop that will rebound, a stark difference to the crash of 2008 that failed to get back to a sense of normal for almost four years. Although it poses plenty of near-term financial challenges, a potential recession this year is not a repeat of the 2008 long-term housing market crash we remember all too well.

Three Reasons Why This Is Not a Housing Crisis | Keeping Current Matters

2. A Recession Does Not Equal a Housing Crisis

Next, take a look at the past five recessions in U.S. history. Home values actually appreciated in three of them. It is true that they sank by almost 20% during the last recession, but as we’ve identified above, 2008 presented different circumstances. In the four previous recessions, home values depreciated only once (by less than 2%). In the other three, residential real estate values increased by 3.5%, 6.1%, and 6.6% (see below):Three Reasons Why This Is Not a Housing Crisis | Keeping Current Matters

3. We Can Be Confident About What We Know

Concerns about the global impact COVID-19 will have on the economy are real. And they’re scary, as the health and wellness of our friends, families, and loved ones are high on everyone’s emotional radar.

According to Bloomberg,

“Several economists made clear that the extent of the economic wreckage will depend on factors such as how long the virus lasts, whether governments will loosen fiscal policy enough and can markets avoid freezing up.”

That said, we can be confident that, while we don’t know the exact impact the virus will have on the housing market, we do know that housing isn’t the driver.

The reasons we move – marriage, children, job changes, retirement, etc. – are steadfast parts of life. As noted in a recent piece in the New York Times, “Everyone needs someplace to live.” That won’t change.

Bottom Line

Concerns about a recession are real, but housing isn’t the driver. If you have questions about what it means for your family’s home buying or selling plans, reach out to one of our associates who would be glad to discuss and consult.

Episode 106: Meghan Pelley – Do unto others as they would have done for themselves

Episode 106: Meghan Pelley – Do unto others as they would have done for themselves

On episode 106 of Success Superstars, Meghan Pelley from San Antonio talks with Mark Johnson, CEO of JP & Associates Realtors about how she produces the fuel that makes the business run for her successfully. She’s received for the sixth year in a row the Platinum Top 50 and for the ninth consecutive year the 5 Star Pro Award.

 

“I implement the Platinum Rule: do unto others as they would have done for themselves.” – Meghan Pelley
Now available on the go: listen to inspirational stories on all podcast platforms including Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Spotify, just search ‘Success Superstars’ anywhere you listen to your favorite podcasts.
7 Tips To Make Working From Home More Productive

7 Tips To Make Working From Home More Productive

Mental Toughness is the choice – the attitude – of staying in inspired action despite the circumstances surrounding you.

JPAR agents our productive! Working out of our 49 locations across the US, including our Texas brokerage operations where we have 26 locations with 105 private offices and shared community workspaces. I thought it timely and important to write about our “new normal” of working from home during this time of social distancing.

While there are many disruptions during the coronavirus outbreak, it’s essential to manage our attitude and mental state. In my view, mental toughness is the choice – the attitude – of staying in inspired action despite the circumstances surrounding you.

As a real estate professional, you are all used to working from a home office, so this blog could be a great reminder for you. For others, as businesses and organizations respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us will be working even more from home. There can be a great deal of additional stress that accompanies the transition to working from home.

Here are a few tips that can help ease the transition or increase the likelihood that you’re able to balance productivity with your other responsibilities:

First, set precise working times

To the extent possible, try to maintain your typical working schedule. If you typically work from 9 am-5 pm when you’re in the office, then try to keep that same schedule when you’re working from home. Now many of my readers are self-employed entrepreneurs… yes, this applies to you. Our number 1 coaching request is dealing with BURN-OUT. Work expands to the time you give it… set your boundaries. Remember the last time you went on vacation and how much you accomplish the day prior? Take that approach to work daily!

Second, maintain boundaries

Maintain clear work-home boundaries. While all in the same space, be intentional about keeping work, home, or school boundaries. Consider this, use time blocks – have a clear off time where you’re done working for the day. As much as possible, don’t let your work spill over to your time away from work. Even in real estate, this is possible…does your lawyer, CPA and other professionals who handle critical matters work 24/7? No… they don’t and neither should you unless you are committed to burn-out.

Third, maintain a virtual connection with others 

Working from home can be an isolating experience. Maintain contact with others by scheduling virtual lunch breaks or coffee chats. Find ways to connect and keep in communication with your others to avoid feelings of loneliness. What about a virtual mastermind group? You can continue your weekly small group meetings video conference or FaceTime.

Fourth, stay hydrated, proper nutrition, and take breaks

This point seems like a no-brainer, but the reality is it can be easy to lose track of time and to forget to engage in daily self-care (like drinking enough water, eating regular meals, and getting enough exercise). Set break times and stick with them. Get up and walk around, stretch, and consider taking 5-minute mindfulness breaks every few hours. Your mobile device probably has built-in reminders or popular apps that are available for your mobile device… there is an app for that! Search your device or your favorite app store.

Fifth, maintain a daily to-do list

For some, working from home can feel overwhelming. Focus on what needs to be done each day by making a daily to-do list. Focus on prioritizing each task each day. I’ve found real estate professionals work best with a “daily action checklist.” A powerful list of all the must-dos for that day, week, or month. Don’t forget some type of daily cardio. Consider these seven actions

  • FaceTime or call someone you haven’t talked to for a while.
  • Pray or meditate more.
  • Write a gratitude list, thank you notes, or thinking of you notes.
  • Walk or hike more; visit a new park.
  • If able, give, or volunteer more. If not, encourage someone who can.
  • Read, write, create something.
  • Play a new game or an old favorite in your off time.

Sixth, make your home office space work for you

If you have a home office space, use it! If not, consider ways that you can create a workspace that will support your work from home situation. Separate work from your bedroom or spaces where you typically relax. If you have to work in your bedroom, at least make some space outside of your actual bed to do work. From a wellness perspective, mental health professionals, so it’s often important as much as possible to have a clear distinction between working spaces and spaces that are intended for relaxation.

  • Set Your Space Up for Productivity.
  • Reduce, Remove or Eliminate Your Distractions.
  • Get Comfortable.
  • Invest in Light Exercise Equipment.
  • Declutter Ruthlessly and Often.
  • Take Eye Breaks.
  • Work with Purpose.

Seventh, reduce distractions

Consider how to remove distractions from your home office environment. That means having a clear boundary for your professional work and your personal work with the associated time blocks. For many readings this, that could mean turning off the TV, your news, and Facebook notifications. For others, having some background noise like classical music or ambient soundtracks can be helpful. It is also important to consider how you’ll maintain your distraction-free work environment if you have a spouse, roommate, partner, children, or pets who will be in your space during your work hours. Talk with all your housemates about work boundaries and how to ensure distraction-free areas so that you’re able to focus on your work. You can also use these tips for working from home with children around. Have a family meeting to discuss the new schedule and boundaries that will help the family during this time.

It’s never been more important to stay connected and avoid being isolated. Besides your circle of influence, many groups our offering assistance on-line for those experience higher levels of stress or coping challenges. Reach out there is a world of help within reach.

And a bonus tip from my sister… after reviewing my draft she sent me “you should add this: dress for work rather than being too informal. You are more productive when you dress for work instead of dressing as if you’re lounging around for the weekend.”

 

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